A new strategy for enhancing the oral bioavailability of drugs with poor water-solubility and low liposolubility based on phospholipid complex and supersaturated SEDDS

Hui Zhou, Jiangling Wan, Lei Wu, Tao Yi, Wei Liu, Huibi Xu, Xiangliang Yang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

29 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A novel supersaturated self-emulsifying drug delivery system (Super-SEDDS) loaded with scutellarin-phospholipid complex (SPC) was developed. The system aimed to address the limitations presented by conventional SEDDS as delivery carriers for drugs with poor water-solubility, low liposolubility and high dose. As an intermediate, SPC was first prepared based on the response surface design. The presence of amorphous scutellarin was demonstrated through differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and X-ray diffraction (XRD), while enhanced liposolubility was confirmed through comparison with scutellarin powder via an octanol/water distribution test. On the basis of the solubility study and ternary phase diagram, Super-SEDDS containing SPC of up to 200% equilibrium solubility (Seq) was designed, which composed of ethyl oleate, Cremophor RH40 and Transcutol HP with a ratio of 60:25:15 (w/w%). The subsequent in vitro lipolysis study and ex vivo intestinal absorption test indicated that Super-SEDDS enhanced the cumulative dissolution from 70% to 100% and improved the intestinal absorption from 0.04 to 0.12 μg/cm2 compared with scutellarin powder. Furthermore, an in vivo study demonstrated that Super-SEDDS achieved the AUC0-t of scutellarin up to approximate 1.7-fold as scutellarin powder. It was also proved superior to SPC and the conventional SEDDS. Super-SEDDS showed great potential for expanding the usage of SEDDS and could act as an alternative to conventional SEDDS.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere84530
JournalPLoS ONE
Volume8
Issue number12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 31 Dec 2013
Externally publishedYes

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