Bisphenol A exposure exacerbates tracheal inflammatory injury in selenium-deficient chickens by regulating the miR-155/TRAF3/ROS pathway

Lin Peng, Shasha Chen, Hongjin Lin, Chunyan Wan, Xiang Li, Shiwen Xu, Shu Li

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Bisphenol A (BPA) is an endocrine disruptor. Excessive BPA intake can damage the structure and function of the respiratory tract. Dietary selenium (Se) deficiency may also cause immune tissue damage. To investigate the potential mechanism of BPA on tracheal damage in selenium-deficient chickens and the role of microRNAs (miRNAs) in this process, we established in vitro and in vivo Se deficiency and BPA exposure models and screened out miR-155 for follow-up experiments. We further predicted and confirmed the targeting relationship between miR-155 and TRAF3 using TargetScan and dual luciferase assays and found that miR-155 was highly expressed and caused inflammatory damage. Further studies showed that BPA exposure increased airway oxidative stress, activated the NF-κB pathway, and caused inflammation and immune damage in selenium-deficient chickens, but down-regulating miR-155 and NAC treatment could reverse this phenomenon. This suggested that these pathways are regulated by the miR-155/TRAF3/ROS axis. In conclusion, BPA exposure aggravates airway inflammation in selenium-deficient chickens by regulating miR-155/TRAF3/ROS. This study revealed the mechanism of BPA exposure combined with Se deficiency in tracheal inflammatory injury in chickens and enriched the theoretical basis of BPA injury in poultry.

Original languageEnglish
Article number127501
JournalInternational Journal of Biological Macromolecules
Volume253
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 31 Dec 2023
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Bisphenol A
  • Chicken
  • Inflammation
  • Selenium
  • Trachea
  • microRNAs

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