Short sprints (30 s) attenuate post-prandial blood glucose in young healthy males

Fang Chan-Dewar, Zhaowei Kong, Qingde Shi, Jinlei Nie

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Aims Low-volume, high-intensity exercise is a time-efficient method of inducing physiological responses and may also improve glucose homeostasis. Therefore, effects of two different volumes of sprint-interval cycling on post-prandial blood glucose were assessed. Methods Twenty healthy young males undertook two Wingate anaerobic tests (2WAT), four Wingate anaerobic (4WAT) and without-exercise (CON) 90 min after eating a standard meal. Blood glucose was examined at 60, 90, 105, 120, 135 and 150 min post-prandially. Results 2WAT and 4WAT both accelerated the decrease of blood glucose compared with CON (P < 0.05). There were significant reductions at 120 (4.45 ± 0.64 vs. 4.93 ± 0.9 vs. 5.68 ± 0.69), 135 (4.28 ± 0.50 vs. 4.48 ± 0.75 vs. 5.54 ± 0.6) and 150 min (4.64 ± 0.71 vs. 4.71 ± 0.73 vs. 5.36 ± 0.48, all P < 0.05). Blood glucose at 120 min was lower after 2WAT than 4WAT (4.45 ± 0.64 vs. 4.93 ± 0.9, P < 0.05), this producing a significant statistical interaction between groups and post-exercise time (P < 0.005). Conclusions 2WAT and 4WAT tests both accelerate the post-prandial decrease in blood glucose in young healthy males, 2WAT being superior to 4WAT in producing this response, even though 2WAT is easier to perform and less time consuming.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)446-450
Number of pages5
JournalPrimary Care Diabetes
Volume9
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Dec 2015

Keywords

  • Diabetes
  • Glycemic control
  • Intensity exercise
  • Sprint interval
  • Wingate test

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