Validation of metacognitive academic writing strategies and the predictive effects on academic writing performance in a foreign language context

Mark Feng Teng, Chenghai Qin, Chuang Wang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

29 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This empirical study serves two purposes. The first purpose is to validate a newly developed instrument, the Metacognitive Academic Writing Strategies Questionnaire (MAWSQ), which represents the multifaceted structure of metacognition in an English as a Foreign Language (EFL) academic writing setting. The second purpose is to delineate the predictive effects of different metacognitive strategies on EFL academic writing performance. Data were collected from 664 students at a university in mainland China. Confirmatory factor analyses (CFA) provided evidence for the fit for two hypothesized models, i.e., an eight-factor correlated model and a one-factor second-order model. Model comparisons documented that the one-factor second-order model was a better model, through which metacognition functions as a higher order construct that can account for the correlations of the eight metacognitive strategies, pertaining to declarative knowledge, procedural knowledge, conditional knowledge, planning, monitoring, evaluating, information management, and debugging strategies. Results also provided evidence for the significant predicting effects of the eight strategies on EFL academic writing performance. The empirical evidence supports the transfer of metacognition theory from educational psychology to interpreting EFL academic writing.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)167-190
Number of pages24
JournalMetacognition and Learning
Volume17
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2022
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Academic writing
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metacognition
  • Metacognitive knowledge
  • Metacognitive regulation

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